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GUN angers Native Americans

Equality group attacks Acti game

Activision's multi-platform wild west shooter GUN is behind a growing storm stateside, with Native Americans angered by their portrayal in the recently launched game. The Association for American Indian Development claims the game includes "some very disturbing racist and genocidal elements toward Native Americans." One part of the game requires the player to slaughter a set number of Apache Indians to complete the section. The 'scalping' tradition and other misinformed inclusions about Native American traditions also rile the group.

The Association has launched an online petition against the game, and are demanding Activision "remove all derogatory, harmful and inaccurate depictions of American Indians from the videogame GUN." Failing this, the group will petition for the game to be banned or removed from sale.

The online petition points to the killing of Apache Indians to complete levels, and also the fact that the game might be played by impressionable youngsters as unacceptable. The group's argument also suggests that the portrayal of other racial groups in this fashion would be regarded as intolerable. The group did however concede that GUN is historically accurate, but countered this by questioning whether a game including the holocaust or slavery would be acceptable subject matters.

Activision have responded to the group's accusations, stating that "GUN was designed to reflect the harshness of life on the American frontier at that time."

"It was not Activision's intention to offend any race or ethnic group with GUN, and we apologize to any who might have been offended by the game's depiction of historical events which have been conveyed not only through video games but through films, television programming, books and other media," continued the official statement, made to GamesIndustry.biz.

Despite the apology, Activision made no mention of altering the game's content. More as we get it.

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